3366 : ATTlTUDES TOWARD DEATH AND END-OF-LIFE CARE OF HUNGARIANS AND NORTH AMERICANS

Author(s): 
Csikos, Agnes; Blasszauer, Bela; McCormick, Kenelm; Gilchrist, Valerie
Text: 
Oral Presentation
Research Based
OBJECTIVE: The hospice movement began in the US in the 1970s, in Hungary in the late 1980s. Studies in North America have investigated perceptions of good end-of-life care and suggest that hospice care meets the needs of dying patients. Little is known about whether the Hungarian hospice movement addresses the needs of Hungarians. The objectives of this study are to learn more about the attitudes of Hungarians toward death and end-of-life care and compare these findings to those from North America.
METHODS: A survey, developed by the authors, was derived from published literature. It contains 30 items, demographic information, forced choice and open ended questions. The survey was administered to consenting adult patients seen in family practice settings in the US and Hungary.
RESULTS: Our study finds that there may be similarities and differences in attitudes in North America and Hungary. For instance, in the US, 88% of people said that they would prefer to die at home rather than in institution if they were terminally ill compared to 51% of Hungarians. In Hungary, as in North America, pain, symptom management and loss of control are important concerns for people at the end of life.
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION: Hospice care is not widely available in Hungary. Initial investigations indicate that hospice may need to develop in a unique manner to meet the needs of Hungarians. Our understanding of hospice care must be informed by ongoing culturally sensitive and population specific needs assessment.
Topic: Cross-cultural Medicine