448 (Po) Correlation Between Aetiology And Treatment Prescribed By Gp's For Rti

Conference: 
Author(s): 
S. Crispi, M. P‚rez, A. Manresa, A. Moragas, J. Boj, L. Marin
Primary Healthcare Jaume I, Tarragona, Spain
Text: 
BACKGROUND:
Antibiotic treatment is only indicated for bacterial infections.
AIM: To determine in which cases antibiotics are prescribed.
METHODS:
Observational multicentre survey carried out in the primary healthcare setting registering all contacts of 8 GPs with patients with RTIs during a 3-week period between January and February 2005. All GPs were said to write down the suspected aetiology of RTIs and which antimicrobial was given.
RESULTS:
815 contacts were registered. Antibiotics were prescribed in 236 RTIs (29%). The most commonly prescribed antimicrobials were amoxicillin (106) followed by amoxicillin-clavulanate (86 cases), quinolones (20), macrolides (17) and others (7). No antibiotics were given to 578 patients. When a bacterial aetiology was suspected (200 cases), antibiotics were prescribed in 199 (99.5%). When the RTI was considered as of viral aetiology (603 cases), antibiotics were prescribed in 25 individuals (4.1%). Atypical aetiology was suspected in 12 cases; in all of them an antimicrobial was written.
CONCLUSIONS:
The correlation of an infection aetiology and antimicrobial prescribing is really very high. Anyway, a room for improvement is needed, so there are some cases of a suspected viral aetiology that are linked with an antibiotic prescribing that should not be given.
Literature: 
448 (PO) CORRELATION BETWEEN AETIOLOGY AND TREATMENT PRESCRIBED BY GP's FOR RTI