Id 392 Schizophrenia And Bipolar Disease Can Be Successfully Managed With Second-Generation Antipsychotics And Improves The Outpatient Treatment In Family Practice. Results: Of The Serenity Study

Conference: 
Author(s): 
Moeremans P, Pitchot W, Taeter C, Duquenne V
Belgium
claire.seymour@xpe-group.com
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Aim(s) or purpose: General Practitioners (GPs) play a central role in the assessment and management of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disease. This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of second-generation antipsychotics in a GP-based management setting.
Design and method: Inclusion: Patients between 18–65 years old, diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar mania and treated with a second generation antipsychotic drug. Quality of Life (QoL) questionnaire (Q-LES-Q-16), the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) for patient well-being, the Clinical Global Impression (CGI-I, Global Improvement) and Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) scores for clinical efficacy and tolerability were assessed at Visit 1 (day 0), Visit 2 (week 4) and Visit 3 (week 8).
Results: Between 2007–2008, 252 patients were enrolled in Belgium. Overall, patients were 44 +/- 12 years old, moderately ill (mean CGI-I overall score) with duration of illness of 11 +/- 9 years. The majority of patients completed the study (90 %), withdrawal due to adverse events was only 2.5 %, 6 % due to non-compliance to study protocol and 1 % due to lack of efficacy. Main outcome measures: Q-LES-Q results demonstrated an improvement in the schizophrenic patients’ functioning with a mean change from baseline of 27 (95 % CI 22–32). The SDS total score decreased for all patients showing an improvement in well-being with a mean change from baseline of 29 (CI 211 28). CGI-I and PGIC scores decreased, indicating an improvement in the patient’s condition. A positive correlation was seen between the satisfaction with medication and efficacy, tolerability and well-being. The number of days lost due to illness and the number of unproductive days, at work or school decreased with a mean change of 21.9 and 22.3, respectively.
Conclusions: With second generation antipsychotics, primary care physicians can successfully treat schizophrenic or bipolar patients without hospitalisation. This approach may enable patients to function in society.
Literature: 
ID 392
Schizophrenia and bipolar disease can be successfully managed with second-generation antipsychotics and improves the outpatient treatment in family practice. Results: of the serenity study